Wine Country B.C.

Closeup on Gamay and Desert Hills Gamay 2008

Posted by winecountrybc on March 23, 2010

This is the second in our Close Up series on wine varieties in the Okanagan valley and this time we’re featuring Gamay. Gamay is sometimes denied its dues as a serious wine grape and sometimes can get ignored altogether. But here in the Okanagan, there are some high quality producers that are making great wines that are extremely easy to sip and savour. In this case, the reputation of the product precedes it and you can hear Amber and AJ smiling just before the wine gets poured.

Wine Country B.C. podcast Desert Hills Gamay 2008

Click on Photo for Wine Country B.C.'s Podcast

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Okanagan Food And Wine Vancouver Food And Wine

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BC’s 5 DVA’s and a Mystery Wine

Posted by winecountrybc on February 23, 2010

There is more to BC wine that the Okanagan Valley. Although the Okanagan is the largest producer of grapes in BC, there are other regions that are putting themselves on the map for quality viticulture. What grapes are being grown in these viticulural areas? Can they all grow similar varieties? Do all the wines that a winery produces have to be from within their own DVA or can they buy grapes from elsewhere? We’ll blind taste a wine from a newer DVA (hint: it isn’t from the Okanagan) and compare notes on all the regions.

B.C.’s 5 Designated Viticultural Areas Click Here or on Image for Podcast >>

UBC's Osoyoos, Okanagan Grape Vines

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Wine and Mood Pairings and Little Straw Tapestry ‘08

Posted by winecountrybc on January 26, 2010

Sometimes pairing wine with food just isn’t enough. If our mood or the atmosphere of our surroundings can influence how we perceive wine, then why not be selective of which wine we enjoy in whatever state we find ourselves in? Do our wine choices change with the seasons? So light some candles, pour a glass of your favorite comfort wine and join us in our zaniest podcast to date.

Wine And Mood Pairings Click Here or on Image Below for Podcast.

Little Straw Tapestry Winery, B.C.

By Luke Whittall

…This topic has been buzzing in my head for a while and was one of the reasons that I started Wine Country BC. I’ve been reading Vines and Wine Access and Wine Spectator and Decanter and Northwest Palate and Vancouver Magazine’s Wine Awards issue and all of their online versions and review sites and all that stuff and I can’t really ever find anything truly negative or positive about wines from Canada. Some blogs can have great and brutally honest critiques (http://tv.winelibrary.com or http://www.vinifico.com for a more local example) but most of the time the passion for the subject (or maybe for the act of blogging itself) propels people into posting things about wines that are most interesting only to themselves. That’s why I stayed away from blogging for so long – who cares what I think? Who the hell am I to write about this stuff? What brought me into the new wave of blogging was the idea that maybe I can contribute constructively to the industry within which I literally live.

The wine industry in BC has been growing at a bizarre rate compared with the rest of the world, where oversupply has created excess product. Wineries here can’t make enough wine and some sell out well before the next vintage is even ready. (Good luck finding any La Frenz product after the fall wine festival. Find More by Luke Whittall on…WineCountry B.C. >>>

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