Domaine Saint Amant Rouge & Blanc

by Paige Donner The Côte du Rhône has, of course, some superstar apellations. Think Châteauneuf du Pape, Crozes-hermitage, Côte-Rôtie, Saint Joseph… to drop some of the big names. But it’s always worth taking a look at smaller producers and less … Continue reading

Oh For The Pleasure of Wine…

by Paige Donner There’s a new sheriff in town… Or, well that’s what it felt like anyway at the brilliant wine dinner hosted by Oenoteam, a wine consultancy based in Libourne, Bordeaux, France.  The dinner was organized here in Paris … Continue reading

L’Académie du Vin & Willi’s Wine Bar on Paris GOODfood+wine Episode 33

by Paige Donner For our January Paris GOODfood+wine show we’re talking all about wine. This show’s inspiration came from the announcement that Steven Spurrier was resuscitating L’Académie du Vin. So, of course, I reached out to his longtime friend here … Continue reading

Three French Wines For Thanksgiving: Fixin, Fat Bastard and Colombelle

Thanksgiving is here and it’s time for feasting. As a nation, we have surely earned it this year with all the election stress. Now it’s time to relax with loved ones over the long weekend and enjoy good food,  home … Continue reading

Moët’s Pop-Up Restaurant With Yannick Alléno

by Paige Donner On a recent round-up of Paris interviews, I succeeded in doing the near-impossible – catching up with the man-in-motion, the chef who never stops, Mr. Yannick Alléno, 3* Michelin chef and champion of local-sourced ingredients for his … Continue reading

2015 International Catering Cup -Shangri-La Team Represents

by Paige Donner At the International Catering Cup competition held earlier this month in Toulouse, the team from Paris’s Shangri-La Hotel took home the top prize. This means they will be representing France in the International competition held in 2015. … Continue reading

Plaza Athénée’s Alpine Pop-Up Restaurant

From the 28th of February to 10th March, Paris’s Hotel Plaza Athénée invites you to experience their Alpine-inspired Pop-Up restaurant.

Cuisine is inspired by the Rhone-Alpe region of France known as the Haut-Savoie with its Savoyarde regional cuisine. Think hearty, mountain cooking for cold nights and white winters!

Welcoming cocktail of warm wine and flammenkuche at 9:00 p.m.

Dinner follows and  is served Continue reading

Fête de la Gastronomie

fete-de-la-gastronomie   Local Food And Wine

Foreword from the Minister

The Fête de la Gastronomie is a festival that is not to be missed, and it will be taking place on the first day of autumn [Sept 23rd]. It will also have its own theme, uniting all the different events and initiatives taking place throughout the country. This year we have chosen Our Earth, because it generously allows us to work it, harvest its fruits, and use them for our food. Because man and earth are inseparable. More INFO

Foreword from the MinisterEverywhere you look there is something to do with gastronomy: in the media, in the increasingly imaginative dishes available in our restaurants…as though the whole idea were something new, whereas in fact it is no more than a tradition in a constant state of renewal, very much alive, and one that makes the most of our country’s dynamism, the foods we produce, and what we do with them. Continue reading

Jaillance Cork Recycling Initiative

By Paige Donner

Jaillance produces the only sparkling wine from France’s Rhône Valley. They call it their “Clairette de Die” and its 7% alcohol content makes it a festive choice for most all occasions. Their rosé, the Cuvée de l’Abbaye, is made from 100% merlot and their “Cremant de Bordeaux” is 70% semillon and 30% cabernet franc.

Jaillance - Local Food And Wine

Jaillance committed to organic farming in 1989 and has more than 200 growers in their winegrowers’ “cooperatif.” They take their commitment to sustainable winemaking seriously… far beyond simply changing out their bottles to the lighter 775gr. from the heavier 830 gr. champagne bottle. Take their cork recycling initiative for instance…

Did You Know?

  • 12 billion corks are manufactured every year. 3 billion of those are destined for France alone!
  • The cork oak tree does not die when its bark is harvested. The bark gradually grows back, like shedding its skin.
  • Cork Oak trees can get up to 300 years old and grow a thick new layer of bark every nine years.
  • 100% of harvested cork is used.
  • Cork oak forests have great ecological value, sustaining a rich level of biodiversity and protecting many species of fauna and flora.
  • A harvested cork oak tree absorbs 2 1/2 to 4 times as much CO2 as one not harvested.

Jaillance’s Cork Recycling Initiative: How It Works

Jaillance Clairette de Die - Local Food And WineStarting this summer Jaillance is calling on their consumers to save and collect their corks and bring them back to designated collection points. These collection points La Cave de Die Jaillance, Jaillance sales outlets and all Gamm Vert Shops (France).

These used corks will be sold back to to the cork industry, and the money sent to the Institut Mediterranéen du Liège (Mediterranean Cork Institute). The Institute will use the funds to plant more cork oaks in the Eastern Pyrenees forests.

Once the wine corks have been collected, the wine corks are taken to a recycling plant to be transformed into floor coverings, decorative items, components for the aerospace and automobile industries – or even into electrical power.

Cork is 100% natural and 100% recyclable.  It is one of nature’s treasures.

To Read More about Jaillance and their Sustainability programs, including their Solar Panel Initiative, Click Here…

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The Men of Vinexpo, France’s Biannual Wine Bonanza

By Paige Donner Read Complete Article on Black Book Magazine A biannual affair, France’s monumental, just-wrapped Vinexpo Bordeaux has, once again, firmly established itself as the world’s leading exhibition for the wine industry. A few numbers: there were approximately 50,000 … Continue reading